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Wednesday, March 02, 2011

Sexting and Other Bad Career Moves

Want to get yourself fired? Combining your sex life with your office life is a good way to get yourself and your career in trouble.

Sexting and Other Bad Career Moves

6 comments:

Class factotum said...

I was hired to clean the email boxes of terminated employees for a friend's cousin's company. Unfortunately, it wasn't just a matter of deleting the entire account - the company is a government contractor and they had to keep work-related emails for several years.

Most of the termed ees got all kinds of personal emails and junk email at work. But one of them, another cousin of the owner! - conducted his entire breakup with his fiancee on his work email, including their discussion of her infidelity and her drug use. I didn't want to know these things!

I wanted to send everyone who was still working there an email saying, "Hotmail is free! Don't be doing your personal business on your work email because it is not private!"

Anonymous said...

Why were you bothering to read the emails? Wouldn't it have been simpler (and cheaper, assuming that your time wasn't free) to just stick the entire mailbox in the archive for the required period of time?

Mike C. said...

@Anonymous -

I'm sure the subject headers are quite descriptive, and there might be rules (either legal or work policies) that say to only keep track of relevant e-mails.

That being said, after all the posts about terrible employers trying to gain access your private electronic spaces, why in the heck would you want to make it that easy for your employer?! It's one thing to have trouble chasing the latest Facebook "Privacy Improvements" but it's another to use work e-mail for personal business!

Alyssa B said...

Hi Evil HR Lady, I have a question:

I was accepted onto a company-wide council for future planning. I was excited for it, and I shared the news with my boss. Who was way less than pleased!

She asked me if I elected to be submitted on my own. I said I had. And she told me that all things like this needed to go through her. I told her that the website that the company had for submitting your interest didn't say that. She said it still needed to go through her.

I checked the website again, and it does not mention anything about checking with your supervisor first. I also checked my email and my supervisor never sent any emails asking for nominations to go through her.

I want to be excited about this because it's an honor. Only a few people in my large company have been placed on this, and the president and his cabinet hand selected us from a group of people that expressed interest.

Am I wrong? Should I have gone through my supervisor first?

Chuck said...

",,accepted onto a company-wide council for future planning. I was excited for it, and I shared the news with my boss. Who was way less than pleased!..."

Suspect it would have been better to have honored a 'chain of command' A simple "what do you think of me doing this?" Rather than blind siding the person, just my thought.

Class factotum said...

Wouldn't it have been simpler to just stick the entire mailbox in the archive for the required period of time?

They were converting to a new email system and were being charged for storage, so it was a money issue that they couldn't keep every single email. There was a lot of non-work stuff cluttering people's boxes. Some users apparently had never deleted a single message, as there were many junk emails from stores and vendors and sex sites. Those, I could delete without reading, but if there wasn't a heading in the subject line, I had to scan a few words to make sure it wasn't about work.