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Wednesday, February 21, 2007

Carnival of Human Resources

Welcome to the first Carnival of Human Resources! Many people have submitted fabulous posts about this lovely world of HR. The next Carnival will be in two weeks (March 7), so please submit your posts by March 6, and you can join the carnival. Submissions can be sent to evilhrlady at or by clicking on the e-mail me link on the side.

And, now, let the Carnival begin!

Because this is the Evil HR Lady's blog, it makes sense that our first post would be Satan's Training Brochure. I always suspected that it existed, but now I know. Wayne Turmel braved fire and brimstone to bring us back this brochure. Here are some sample headers:
  • God Only Wishes He Was in Sales: getting the rest of the organization to appreciate your brilliance
  • Getting To Maybe:- Delayed Decision Making For the Budget-Constrained
  • Mastering PowerlessPoint: Perfecting the Defensive Presentation
  • The Seven Habits of Not-Completely-Useless People: Working Just Hard Enough To Keep Your Job

  • Clearly Lisa Rosendahl didn't take any of the above classes. She deals with decision making and makes it pretty clear that she recognizes the issues around the decisions. Sometimes there is more than one way to see things:
    I have a Human Resource Specialist who made a decision a few weeks ago. Without getting into the HR details of it, this was a pure matter of interpretation. The service line does not agree with the decision. For me, this decision comes down to value. The decision made placed the value differently than where the service line is placing it. Is one value judgment right and one wrong? Absolutely not. May the decision change? Maybe and maybe not.

    Deb over at 8 Hours and a Lunch talks about taking employee suggestions seriously. She writes :
    who better knows how to improve a process than the people using it? sure. management and leadership are an important component in making improvements work. but sometimes the elegant solutions come from the factory floor, the person answering the phones, the programming gurus, those on the front lines.

    but listening to employees and implementing improvements they’ve recommended can be an opportunity for something sometimes less obvious. it can be key to helping you develop them as well.

    Development and business improvement in one easy step. What more could an HR department want?

    And finally, from me, a post about workplace bullies. I've encountered them. I think you have too. I think they took Satan's training classes. Hmmm, maybe I'll look at that brochure again.

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