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Thursday, November 18, 2010

SR: DUI, Juggling Job Searches and Offers

Please allow me to set the stage for you. Following a DUI offence, an employee is required to operate a vehicle that has an IID (ignition interlock device) installed, as required by the state (DMV), and at this time the corporation is not privy to this information. The employee is a Territory Manager, of a three state area. Driving is an integral part of the job responsibilities. If said employee contacted HR disclosing this "heavy hearted" situation with remorse and contrition; has received counseling and is an exemplary employee. Could the employee be dismissed from job responsibilities? Secondly, would the dismissal be discriminatory? (Argument: Driver with an IID would not pose a risk to public safety, and does not restrict the employee from continuing to complete all job responsibilities.)

I understand you are not an attorney and are unable to give any legal advice, however if you have any knowledge of this type of situation that could benefit someone in need, it would be greatly appreciated.

You're right. I'm not an attorney and things such as this vary from state to state, but you bet your booty I'd want you out of the company. Why? LIABILITY. I know nothing about IID, but I wouldn't want to trust a piece of electronic equipment to verify that my employee is not driving while under the influence. Since a DUI is very closely related to your job (since you have to drive to do it), I wouldn't see any problem with termination.

I'm not a lawyer, though, so you might want to check with an actual attorney (labor and employment law, not your DUI guy) in your state.

I have found myself in a very odd situation. I joined a well reputed MNC's training program after completing grad school about a year and a half ago. Lets call it company A. It was a great company to work for but the work itself turned out to be a complete disappointment. It was all busy work (mostly data entry and maintaining customer records!) and I felt I was wasting myself considering I wasn't getting a chance to develop essential skills such as critical thinking and problem solving etc. When I shared my concerns with my manager, she candidly told me that I had to wait out another 3-4 years in order to get the kind of assignments that I was pining for simply because it is a knowledge-intensive industry and values those who have done grunt work at the bottom level. Meanwhile I applied for a few jobs within the corporation but in other countries but to no response.

About a month back I landed a job at another company and the JD was exactly what I wanted to do at this point in my career. The catch is that this company (Company B) wasn't a choice employer like the MNC I worked for was. But after several marathon discussions with HR & my Manager, I resigned and completed my notice period and quit on great terms. The particular project that I was hired for doesn't start for another month and a half so I was also glad to have a break in between.

Here is the twist, 3 days after I completed my notice period, I got a response for one of my applications from the HRD of Company A's regional office in another part of the globe. I had applied for this about 3 months before resigning. They have invited me to attend their recruitment event next month. Although the vacancy I applied for wasn't listed as an 'internal opening' nor was prior Company A experience listed as a requirement but I am certain that the fact that I was coming within the organization was a deciding factor in shortlisting me. This is a a once in a life time opportunity that would allow me to work in varying business environments/cultures across the region and I definitely want to attend this event to find out more. But how would I convince the interviewers to ignore the fact that I very recently resigned from this company and evaluate me like they would evaluate any other candidate.

P.S. Company A doesn't have any policy against rehiring ex employees provided you haven't been fired for integrity violation which thankfully I wasn't.

If you haven't signed a contract with the new company, then I'd go ahead with the interview on the other job. There's no guarantee you'll get it.

If you do get the dream position, you'll have to resign the new job and you will have slammed the door shut on that company forever. If that's not something you want to do (even low-prestige companies are worth having in your pocket), then don't bother with the new interview.

I hate that that happened to you. So frustrating!

Been unemployed for 4 months and am trying to score a job in advertising. I've met a ton a people and networking everyday. In August, I got a chance to interview with a reputable ad agency who has just won a big account and thus growing. The agency is based out west and due to the size of the account they are in the process of opening up an office in the midwest.

Now the interview wet extremely well because I had some friends working at the company who told me so. Some time had passed and one of the superiors who will be in the midwest office asked to interview me, which I did. I think I did well during that interview as well. I initially checked in with my midwest interviewer after some time who informed me that he would love to hire me, but they want me out west. I mentioned to both that I'm okay with either office..just want to work. So I checked in with my interviewer out west who mentioned she would like to hire me, but is in the midst of getting their midwest office situated before getting to her own hires. Their midwest office is schedule to open in December.

So the dilemma really is...what should I do? They haven't said no and I want to work there. All my insiders have told me to wait it out and they reassured me that both bosses loved me during the interview. It's just it's taking so long. So I don't know if I should abandon hope and move on or just keep following up. It's really tough because of all agencies I've networked with, this is the best lead I have in this economic climate. Hope you can shed some light and appreciate anything you can tell me.

When you say wait it out, are you turning down other job offers or have you just stopped looking for a new job? Because there is no way on earth I'd stop looking for a job until I had a signed job offer in hand. These things fall through all the time.

If you've got other offers, then go back to this company and tell them the situation. They may be unable to move forward because they haven't made up their minds about the new office. Suck it up and move on.

1 comment:

Ask a Manager said...

OMG. First of all, this makes me realize that I stole your idea. I've been doing "short answer Saturdays" similar to this, and I never, ever credited you for it. I will be remedying that with the next one, and huge apologies.

Secondly, to OP #2, this is a small quibble, but one I will register nonetheless. Data entry and maintaining customer records is not "busy work." Busy work is stuff that someone gives you to keep you busy but which has no real value. Data entry and records maintenance is hugely important. I realize it may not have had much value to YOU, but it did to the company; be careful not to speak of it as "busy work" or you'll come across as inappropriately disparaging.

That is all.